How Stand-Alone Medical Malpractice Tail Policies Can Save Money


The medical malpractice insurance environment is always changing and it's hard to know if you're getting the best deal. Click here to learn more about how stand-alone medical malpractice tail policies could save you money. [More]


The never-ending issues of “tail coverage”


If you’re a physician purchasing tail coverage or a physician who is changing the carrier you’re insured with, you should be reading this. Fully understanding how your tail coverage works and the intricacies behind it, from a coverage standpoint, should be fully understood by you or by the person helping you (your broker). I’ll give two examples about what I’m referring to and why it’s important. [More]


Choosing a MPL Carrier: Admited, Surplus, or RRG


If you are searching for the best medical malpractice insurance policies, you may be faced with terms like admitted and regulated coverage, Risk Retention Groups and surplus lines. What follows below is helpful information about the multiple forms of malpractice insurance available to you. [More]


Why shopping for tail coverage matters in today’s malpractice insurance marketplace


So you have to purchase “malpractice tail coverage”
The medical malpractice insurance marketplace continues to evolve as more regulations and government oversights place more pressure on traditional medical practices to evolve, join a larger group practice, or sell out to the local hospital system. Although this issue brings up a number of items to potentially dive into, the one I would like to focus on today is the question I most often receive from my clients: “What about my tail coverage?” With the changing healthcare landscape, insurance companies have begun to develop more “product offerings” to increase their revenue capturing opportunities. Not only are they looking to capture more revenue opportunities, but they are also beginning to think creatively rather than staying within the antiquated mindset that carriers have traditionally shown in the malpractice insurance marketplace. [More]


Proper Planning of Physician Retirement & Medical Malpractice Insurance


As a physician approaches retirement, one of the most important items on the to-do list is to ensure adequate insurance coverage for any future malpractice claims that may arise after the practice doors are closed. Due to the “long tail” nature of malpractice claims, patients may bring a claim against their physician (or other healthcare provider) long after the date actual care took place. This is why you consider the risk of being sued months and even years after their practice is closed. [More]


Top 10 Things to Consider When Buying a Medical Malpractice Insurance Policy


There is a significant amount of information on medical malpractice insurance and the accompanying different kinds of policies and features a physician can purchase. While it is beneficial that so much information is available, it can actually lead to many physicians feeling overwhelmed and confused rather than informed and enlightened. It is with this underlying issue, that I would like to simplify things. Here are the top 10 things to consider when buying medical malpractice insurance policy (in no particular order of importance): [More]


Deciphering who covers your tail


When it comes down to who is responsible for purchasing your medical malpractice insurance tail when you are leaving a group should always be discussed and agreed upon in a contract at the beginning of your employment. If this was not previously addressed then there are different situations that can arise, each one depending on either the group you are leaving or if you are joining a new group. One way that can happen is that you end up having to pay for your tail if both, the group you have left or the group you are switching to refuse to purchase it on your behalf. The next could be if that you do not feel that you need to tail, but your old group does not feel comfortable having a period of no coverage then they would end up buying it. Another outcome is that the new group agrees to pay percentages of your tail, but depending on the number of years that you keep practicing with them. For instance, a new group could make a deal with you that if you leave after the first year then you must pay for your own tail, after two years then you would both split the costs, and if you stay with them for three or more then they cover all of the costs. These are all possible to happen; it just depends on who has more leverage in the situation. [More]